Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Psychic Spies: Yes, They're Real

Photo by conner bowe on Unsplash

Psychic Spies: Yes, They're Real

If someone were to tell you that government officials had spent millions of taxpayer money to try to recruit psychics for international defense systems, would you believe them? Wild as it sounds, the U.S. government did just that in 1978 with its Stargate Project. Though this isn't the first time the government has seemingly had a close call with the paranormal , it is the first time that they were open about being interested in recruiting psychics. Here's the strange, wild, and unbelievable story of psychic spies in the US military...

The Stargate Project: It's Out of This World

Most of the programs were fielded by Fred "Skip" Atwater and Maj. Gen. Albert Stubblebine, two military heads who focused in on remote viewing. The goal of the projects were all to help military intelligence officials get more details about opposing military intelligence without having to resort to technology to do so. Some later-declassified projects also were designed to let psychics attack opponents using their minds, though these programs weren't the least bit effective except for being box office-ready concepts.

Spy School 101: Remote Viewing

Remote viewing is the practice of learning how to use clairvoyance on command. By honing the skill of clairvoyance, the psychic spies could "see" information about where people were, what they were doing, or who they are talking to. Of all the projects under the Stargate name, this was considered to be the most effective. To this day, some groups actually teach remote viewing to those who want to try it out. However, results were mixed at best.

Intelligence officials who were trained to be remote viewers couldn't just tell agencies what they saw. Words can be misinterpreted, or just be a bit vague to those who hear them. For the military to get the details they needed, remote viewers had to give visual cues. In other words, the Stargate Project remote viewers were also instructed to draw what they saw —including people, local regions, landmarks, and more. Many of those drawings have since been declassified.

Gone, But Not Forgotten

Project Stargate was ended in 1995, after the U.S. government claimed that the spies were not effective. On the other hand, those who were trained in remote viewing swear by their skills. So, things aren't really adding up. Why would they get rid of this talent, if it could potentially help the troops? Rumor has it that psychic spy programs are still around, but are being covered up because they are as effective as can be.




This is a contributed post by Jane Sandwood. Jane has been a freelance writer and editor for over 10 years. She writes for both digital and print across a wide variety of fields. Her main interest is exploring how people can improve their health and wellbeing in their everyday lives. When she isn't writing, Jane can often be found with her nose in a book, at the gym or just spending time with her family.



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1 comment:

  1. The story of the Star Gate program -- and its Soviet/Russian counterparts -- is told by the 1985-1995 Program Director, Edwin C. May (attached to the program since 1975), along with Joeseph McMoneagle (Viewer #001) and with contributions by Russian military involved in their own programs. It's all in the book ESP WARS: EAST AND WEST by Edwin C. May, Victor Rubel, Joseph W. McMoneagle and Loyd Auerbach.

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