Friday, February 17, 2012

Trail Camera Tips by Waylen

Setting a Game Camera
TRAIL CAMS



Things to consider when selecting a trail camera.

1)  Try selecting a camera with a higher mega pixel rating. An 8 MP camera will take considerably better images than a camera with a 2 MP rating.
2)  Camera range can be anywhere from 20 feet to 50 feet. This is the maximum range in which the sensor in the sensor in the camera will detect motion or heat. This is also the maximum range for flash.
3)  Cameras can also have a delay period from 1 min to 15 sec. This delay period is the amount of time from which the sensor detects a recordable event and an image is captured.
4)  Trail cams also come with either an incandescent or infrared flash. Ranges  in incandescent units are normally lower than infrared, but take color images at night were infrared images appear black and white at night.

Once you have selected your camera, be sure to program and test your camera before heading to the field. Be sure to set time, date, and delay periods. Now test fire your camera by 
walking in front of it at the correct range to insure proper operation. You can insert the SD card in a digital camera to check the image.

Now that you have tested your camera, its time to locate a field location suitable. Be sure to select a location that has fresh sign for your intended target. Heavily used game trails are a good choice, especially trails in a funnel down location, or intersecting game trails.

Once a site is chosen, locate a sturdy, large diameter tree that will not be blown around in the wind, as this movement will trigger the camera, it is also recommended that your camera face either north or south if possible, as the rising and setting sun can also trigger your camera. You may also want to position your camera at a slight angle to the game trail, as many cameras will not detect motion  moving directly toward or away from the camera as easily as motion moving across the sensor at an angle. Remember to keep the target area within the range of your camera, the camera should be positioned about 1-2 feet higher than your target will be tall, and placed at a slight downward angle, and make sure the camera is securely attached to the tree, as most wildlife will be curious about your camera.

Now that your camera is in position, power it on and wait for the camera to enter sleep mode. Once the camera is in sleep mode, walk in front of the camera at the desired range until the camera trips, and records an image. Power the cam off and remove the SD card, now place it into your digital camera to view your test image. Make sure the camera position is correct, and time, date, and delay period are correct and make any necessary adjustments. Now its time to descent the camera and clean the lens and flash, and let it dig!!
When returning to your camera, remember to walk in front of your camera until it takes an image, power it off and remove the SD card to insure camera operation and settings are still correct, use fresh batteries that you have tested on a multimeter for full voltage,  install an empty SD card, descent the camera, and clean the lens and flash. You never know what you will capture on you camera, you might even catch a surprise visitor!!!!!

[Article by Waylen Frederick ]
    
  Here is some Trail Cam Pictures Taken by Waylen



Night Picture




Looks like a big cat watching these deer





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1 comment:

  1. It is remarkable blog. I wanted to learn such type of the things that I have got from here at one platform. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete

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