Thursday, September 27, 2012

The Eyes Of A Sasquatch



Cat eye shine - is it similar to bigfoot eye shine?

The Eyes Of A Sasquatch

Examining A Night Hunters Possible Adaptation

By TCC Team Member Dorraine Fisher
 

            There have been numerous reports of sasquatch eye shine being spotted and photographed at night from the dark forests. It isn’t too unusual to see many different animals in the dark; their eyes glowing and reflecting, often from light created by humans.  But what’s interesting about many of these Saquatch sightings lately is that people observe that the creature’s eyes glow without any light to reflect.

            The eyes of many nocturnal animals have a reflective layer known as the tapetum lucidum with helps their eyes collect more light allowing better night vision. It’s a very important skill for night time hunters.

            But as a larger number of researchers are out collecting Sasquatch data in the darkest forests at night without flashlights, it’s becoming increasingly curious that the creatures may have actually evolved a unique vision adaptation known as bioluminescence.

            Bioluminescent creatures include deep see fish, certain insects, and microorganisms. But as far as science knows right now, no creature has bioluminescent eyes. So what would account for these types of reports of Sasquatches?

            Though scientists do acknowledge the possibility of this phenomenon, they disagree as to whether this would be any extraordinary advantage to a night hunting creature. And why would a sasquatch evolve their vision differently than any other night hunter?

            Some argue that the light produced by the bioluminescent eye would hinder the creatures actual ability to see.  And since Sasquatches are known to shy away from bright light at night, they are very adapted to their night world. But does this necessarily mean that their eyes produce their own light.

            Bioluminescence in other creatures is known to serve many purposes including, camouflage, a way to distract predators, a way to repel predators (such as the light in fireflies), a way to attract a mate (as in certain sea creatures), a method of communication, or simply a way to see better in very dark habitats. But many would argue that none of these reasons would explain bioluminescent eyes on a sasquatch. As many other night hunters survive very well with the normally reflective eyes of any other  nocturnal animal.

            But these reports persist. And unfortunately we’re a long way from discovering the reason. But Sasquatches seem especially in tune to their environment and seem to possess so many special adaptations that have helped them survive all these thousands of years. Is it really so much of a stretch to imagine that their vision may be unique too?  *********DF
©The Crypto Crew
[photo credit: Waylen Frederick] 



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1 comment:

  1. I believe they have some developed some form of "night vision."(unintentional pun) They are able to hunt & navigate dense forest environments on pitch black nights. How could a creature do this & survive without the ability to see things such as low hanging branches, prey animals; etc. Common sense should dictate that their ability to see at night has evolved in ways we can only imagine. It would be nice if we humans could see the forest & the trees. We can't even see the forest for the trees.

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